Workshops/Seminars: January - June 2018

S/N Title Course Instructor(s)   Date/Time
1 IVLE for teaching and learning: Getting started (IVLE: Part 1)
Register now

Synopsis
IVLE (Integrated Virtual Learning Environment) is a learning management system designed to facilitate and supplement teaching and thereby, promote student learning at NUS. A comprehensive introduction to IVLE, this hands-on workshop will enable you to create and manage a module with emphasis on the commonly used tools like the workbin and the discussion forum. It will also cover a brief overview of the other tools available in IVLE.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • create and setup a module;
  • plan and scaffold teaching and learning activities;
  • disseminate content and digital multimedia; and
  • provide an overview of assessment and survey tools.
Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong 11/01/2018 (Thursday)
2pm-4pm
2 Facilitating effective online discussions using IVLE (IVLE: Part 2)
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Synopsis
Online discussions are a great way of extending classroom discussions and learning by getting students to engage with course materials and readings. A discussion forum is one of the most frequently used learning technology tools that supports online discussion. It is an alternative form of communication to in-class, verbal discussion – whether simply to provide variety in the subject, to meet the different needs and preferences of individuals, or to allow students time to reflect on the debate and consider their response before contributing. Forums allow for time-delayed communication and asynchronous learning – anytime, anywhere. In this hands-on workshop, we will focus on IVLE discussion forum that is widely-used on campus.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • differentiate asynchronous and synchronous communication tools;
  • facilitate and manage discussions using forums in IVLE; and
  • reflect on ways to enhance student-teacher interaction both inside and outside the classroom.
Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong 12/01/2018 (Friday)
10am-12noon
3 Assessing student learning using IVLE (IVLE: Part 3)
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Synopsis
Assessment is a crucial element in enhancing the overall quality of teaching and learning in higher education. What and how students learn depends to a major extent on how they think they will be assessed (Biggs & Tang, 2007). This workshop focuses on the creation and use of assessment and quizzing materials for your courses using IVLE. Participants will discover how online assessment is valuable and how using these tools can create a dynamic learning environment.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • set up online tests and quizzes;
  • create question banks to create assessment questions, quizzes or MCQs;
  • analyse different situations for which an online assessment can be used; and
  • identify various approaches to provide timely and constructive feedback.
Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong 12/01/2018 (Friday)
2pm-4pm
4 Developing e-Learning resources using Camtasia Studio
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Synopsis
Learn how to record, edit and share your lectures online using Camtasia Studio. This application allows you to easily capture everything happening from your computer screen with audio narration. It can even use PowerPoint directly to record your presentation.

In this hands-on workshop, you will learn to create effective video-based learning for your course. You will learn to record your screen, add voice narration, call-outs and other media files, editing techniques, and producing a professional online video.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this workshop, participants should be able to:
  • apply the principles of multimedia design into presentation slides
  • record a lecture using Camtasia Recorder
  • add content to a Camtasia Studio project
  • apply editing techniques
  • share and produce a video file
Charina Ong 16/01/2018 (Tuesday)
10am-12noon
5 Online synchronous discussions for tutorials using WebEx
Register now

Synopsis
The adoption of blended learning in higher education has advanced the use of technology to conduct tutorials through online synchronous discussion. Online synchronous discussions have the potential to enhance the study experience of students who are not able to attend the face-to-face class/tutorial. In this hands-on workshop, the facilitators will share a framework and some considerations for facilitating online synchronous tutorial discussion.

We will also introduce you to WebEx, a powerful Web conferencing application that allows you and your students to collaborate in a secure online environment. WebEx allows you to share documents and deliver presentations in real time using a Web browser and voice connection. The chat, Q&A, and poll features will definitely engage your students.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • Identify the key principles and best practices to engage, connect, and support students in 'real-time' online learning.
  • Use the WebEx communication tools to facilitate synchronous discussion and e-tutorials.
Charina Ong & Jeanette Choy 25/01/2018 (Thursday)
10am-12noon
6 Introducing teaching portfolio (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 1)
Register now

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 1 introduces participants to the teaching portfolio, considers high quality teaching, and focuses on writing the teaching philosophy statement.
Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan 21/02/2018 (Wednesday)
9am-12noon
7 Promoting student engagement in large classes
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Synopsis
Teaching a large lecture class presents several unique challenges and therefore requires a higher level of planning – both practical and pedagogical. This session is planned taking into account research that shows an increase in learning gain when learning activities are carefully-designed to increase student engagement in their learning.

This workshop will introduce some of the best practices for tackling the large-lecture experience by focusing on three key areas: (1) getting students prepared for lectures, (2) promoting interactivity during lecture, and (3) encouraging team-based activities. Through hands-on activities and in-depth discussions, we will explore some research-informed active learning strategies that will enable you to create opportunities for effectively engaging students when teaching in large class settings.

Please bring your own device (BYOD) and join us in exploring how technology tools can support active learning and promote engagement in the classroom.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • understand the challenges faced in large classes;
  • design learning activities for active learning and engagement; and
  • explore how technology tools can be used to support the strategies that promote active engagement.
Kiruthika Ragupathi 22/02/2018 (Thursday)
10am-12noon
8 Writing and using Intended Learning Outcomes
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Synopsis
Intended learning outcomes (ILOs) are an important part of any module outline because they set out how the aims of the module will be achieved. When explicitly articulated, well-developed ILOs serve to help students to identify the key abilities that they are expected to derive from the module. Students could then set definite targets and work purposefully towards achieving them. When designing a module, well-crafted ILOs are especially useful for academic teachers when they use it to guide them in planning the routes to navigate learners through their learning, thus leading to a more student-centred approach in module design. This 3-hour interactive workshop aims to enable participants to apply a set of pedagogy-based guiding principles to construct good ILOs and use them for module design. Participants will also have the opportunity to craft their own module’s ILOs and review fellow participants’ drafts during the workshop.
Adrian Lee & Alan Soong 22/02/2018 (Thursday)
2pm-5pm
9 Introducing teaching portfolio (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 1)
Register now

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 1 introduces participants to the teaching portfolio, considers high quality teaching, and focuses on writing the teaching philosophy statement.
Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan 23/02/2018 (Friday)
9am-12noon
10 Curriculum mapping and assurance of learning
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Synopsis
Increasing pressures from accreditation and regulation continue to push universities to demonstrate accountability and quality in their program offerings. Assurance of learning (AoL) is one such exercise and it refers to processes for demonstrating that students achieve learning expectations for the programs in which they participate. An important first step in AoL is curriculum mapping, a process designed to achieve overall coherence in a program of study. Another important part of AoL is “closing the loop” –– making continuous improvements based on the assurance of learning results. This presentation will illustrate the AoL process in the Faculty of Business and Economics (FBE) at the University of Melbourne which began in 2009 as part of its Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation. It will also highlight the significant curriculum mapping exercise undertaken in 2016-2017 to achieve coherence in programs and to identify curriculum gaps, redundancies and misalignments.
Participants will be exposed to the exercise and processes involved in curriculum mapping and “assuring” learning and its implications for curriculum reviews, from the experience of FBE. The aim is to highlight the benefits and challenges of doing curriculum mapping and AoL. Of particular interest to academics and academic developers is this presentation’s focus on achieving greater curriculum alignment, continuous improvement and outcomes-based assessment – all towards ensuring quality in teaching and learning and the student experience.
Angelito Calma 23/02/2018 (Friday)
2pm-4pm
11 Introducing teaching portfolio (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 1)
Register now

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 1 introduces participants to the teaching portfolio, considers high quality teaching, and focuses on writing the teaching philosophy statement.
Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan 26/02/2018 (Monday)
2pm-5pm
12 Designing an authentic learning environment
Register now

Synopsis
An authentic learning environment provides “an authentic context that reflects the way knowledge and skills will be used in real life” (Herrington & Herrington, 2006). The goal of designing such a learning environment is to promote greater student engagement and to broaden students’ learning experience. Examples of how authentic activities are instantiated in various disciplinary domains in university settings will be shared at the session.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • Articulate the characteristics of authentic learning with a practice oriented framework.
  • Apply the characteristics to design an authentic learning environment within their module.

Reference
Herrington, A., & Herrington, J. (2006). What is an authentic learning environment? In A.J. Herrington, & J. Herrington (Eds.), Authentic learning environments in higher education (pp. 1-13). Hershey, PA: ISP.
Alan Soong 02/03/2018 (Friday)
2pm-4pm
13 Working with evidence (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 2)
Register now

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 2 builds on session 1 to identify levels of impact and domains of evidence, interpret and analyse data from different sources within a coherent case narrative, and demonstrate enhancement of practice over time.

Participants are required to complete session 1 before attending session 2.
Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan 06/03/2018 (Tuesday)
2pm-5pm
14 Citation analysis
Register now

Synopsis
Citation analysis, likened too to bibliometrics or scientometrics, is pooling bibliometric data from publications to measure the relative importance and impact of an author, article, or publication that has been cited by others. Its flexibility allows it to be used in any discipline. Recently, it has been used to explore the research “geography” of a certain discipline. Its method of analysis has moved beyond simple frequency counts (e.g. most cited article, most published author); rather, it is now coupled with tools to manage complex and large data using a combination of thematic analysis, social network analysis and data visualisation tools (such as using Gephi or Kumu). I have had recent success in publishing research in this area in top-tier journals (including Studies in Higher Education and Journal of International Business Studies), either analysing the publication history of a single journal or comparing several journals in a particular domain. My contribution lies in extracting all available publication metadata and making sense of the key players in the field by identifying patterns and trends and visualising them.
This seminar will present my recent experience in using citation analysis in both my publication in the business and higher education fields. I will also introduce two new collaborative works I am currently writing and the early steps and challenges associated with research of this ilk. Because citation analysis can be applied in any discipline, participants will be interested in thinking about its potential in meta-analysing their fields of interest.
Angelito Calma 07/03/2018 (Wednesday)
10am-12noon
15 Tracking student learning through mid-semester feedback
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Synopsis
Many educators see mid-semester feedback as one of the best methods that will strengthen the student-teacher relationship as well as provide valuable information on how they can improve their teaching. End-of-semester evaluations often emphasise perceived faculty “performance”, but with mid-semester evaluations simple changes can be incorporated early on, to help motivate students and enhance student learning. Students tend to like this process because it gives them a chance to voice opinions on issues that are most critical to them, and they appreciate the fact that the instructor has solicited their opinions.

This workshop will show you how to assess student progress or gather feedback from students by using online survey tools and will also explore the use of other technology tools to gather feedback.

This workshop will be offered in a fully online mode and will comprise two parts:
(1) A pre-workshop video and discussion
(2) An online webinar with hands-on session and discussion

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the key benefits and challenges of using mid-semester feedback
  • reflect on strategies and methods of collecting informal feedback; and
  • design a mid-semester feedback survey
Kiruthika Ragupathi 08/03/2018 (Thursday)
10am-12noon
16 Working with evidence (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 2)
Register now

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 2 builds on session 1 to identify levels of impact and domains of evidence, interpret and analyse data from different sources within a coherent case narrative, and demonstrate enhancement of practice over time.

Participants are required to complete session 1 before attending session 2.
Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan 13/03/2018 (Tuesday)
9am-12noon
17 Supporting academic integrity in your courses
Register now

Synopsis
What can you do as an instructor to encourage your students to do honest work? There are many reasons cited by students when they are asked why they cheated, plagiarised or collaborated dishonestly. Adopting a variety of strategies to teach and support academic integrity in your class can reduce infractions. In this workshop, we will talk about why students plagiarise and discuss some strategies for designing activities and assessments that can minimise plagiarism in student’s work.

Learn how you can use Turnitin to promote the proper citation and acknowledgement of others’ works. We will debunk myths about Turnitin and explore its features, showing ways you can leverage the service to reduce instances of plagiarism.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the reasons behind student plagiarism;
  • reflect on strategies that guide the academic writing process;
  • discuss strategies for designing assessments that can minimise plagiarism; and
  • describe the Turnitin’s features and how it works in IVLE
  • create an assignment, leveraging Turnitin, that encourages academic integrity
Kiruthika Ragupathi & Kenneth Pinto 13/03/2018 (Tuesday)
2pm-4pm
18 Working with evidence (Teaching Portfolio Course: Session 2)
Register now

Synopsis
The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • identify the characteristics of good teaching
  • reflect on the criteria for good teaching
  • develop a personal teaching philosophy
  • analyse and interpret relevant data to develop case narratives
  • construct a coherent teaching portfolio that documents their practice by putting together their teaching philosophy statement and case narratives

Session 2 builds on session 1 to identify levels of impact and domains of evidence, interpret and analyse data from different sources within a coherent case narrative, and demonstrate enhancement of practice over time.

Participants are required to complete session 1 before attending session 2.
Johan Geertsema & Mark Gan 21/03/2018 (Wednesday)
9am-12noon
19 Developing rubrics for assessing students' learning
Register now

Synopsis
A rubric is a scoring tool that lists the criteria for student work and articulates levels of quality for each criterion. It can help in communicating your expectations to students while also helping you in assessing student work fairly and efficiently. They can also provide students with informative feedback on their strengths and weaknesses, and prompt students to reflect on their own work.

In this workshop, we discuss key features of a quality rubric, present some examples of rubric for assessing student work. You will then have an opportunity to use the steps discussed to construct a rubric for one of your assessment tasks.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • describe the purpose of rubric in assessing student learning
  • understand how to use rubric to improve the results of assessment tasks
  • discuss various types of rubrics
  • identify components of and steps to developing a rubric
  • construct a rubric
Mark Gan & Kiruthika Ragupathi 22/03/2018 (Thursday)
9am-12noon
20 Using technology to scaffold student learning
Register now

Synopsis
What is scaffolding? How does it help learning? Can technology be used? Does it work? Scaffolding can come in a variety of forms, from increasing engagement, providing alternate learning strategies, resolving learning bottlenecks, and (paradoxically) taking away support to allow students to master material, among other things.

This workshop will highlight technology that can provide appropriate scaffolding. We will look at technologies that can be used before, during and after class. In all applications of different problems, we will start with the question, “what is the problem?” Join us with your problems and let’s discuss whether scaffolding will help.
Adrian Lee 28/03/2018 (Wednesday)
2pm-4pm
21 Promoting active learning in a STEM tutorial class
Register now

Synopsis
There is increasing evidence that active learning promotes engagement and improves student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics (e.g., Freeman et al., 2014). But what is active learning? And how can it be employed in a STEM small-group tutorial class? This workshop will highlight how instructors can design activities and assignments that enable students to work effectively together taking into consideration how best to make use of the affordances offered by active learning classrooms and working in teams. This session will also introduce and explore a few approaches and models for implementing active learning in your classroom.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this workshop, participants should be able to:
  • identify the affordances offered by active learning;
  • describe models for implementing active learning; and,
  • design and plan active learning activities for use during tutorials.
Adrian Lee 04/04/2018 (Wednesday)
2pm-4pm
22 Designing an authentic learning environment
Register now

Synopsis
An authentic learning environment provides “an authentic context that reflects the way knowledge and skills will be used in real life” (Herrington & Herrington, 2006). The goal of designing such a learning environment is to promote greater student engagement and to broaden students’ learning experience. Examples of how authentic activities are instantiated in various disciplinary domains in university settings will be shared at the session.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • Articulate the characteristics of authentic learning with a practice oriented framework.
  • Apply the characteristics to design an authentic learning environment within their module.

Reference
Herrington, A., & Herrington, J. (2006). What is an authentic learning environment? In A.J. Herrington, & J. Herrington (Eds.), Authentic learning environments in higher education (pp. 1-13). Hershey, PA: ISP.
Alan Soong 17/04/2018 (Tuesday)
2.30pm–4.30pm
23 IVLE for teaching and learning: Getting started (IVLE: Part 1)
Register now

Synopsis
IVLE (Integrated Virtual Learning Environment) is a learning management system designed to facilitate and supplement teaching and thereby, promote student learning at NUS. A comprehensive introduction to IVLE, this hands-on workshop will enable you to create and manage a module with emphasis on the commonly used tools like the workbin and the discussion forum. It will also cover a brief overview of the other tools available in IVLE.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • create and setup a module;
  • plan and scaffold teaching and learning activities;
  • disseminate content and digital multimedia; and
  • provide an overview of assessment and survey tools.
Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong 10/05/2018 (Thursday)
10am-12noon
24 Facilitating effective online discussions using IVLE (IVLE: Part 2)
Register now

Synopsis
Online discussions are a great way of extending classroom discussions and learning by getting students to engage with course materials and readings. A discussion forum is one of the most frequently used learning technology tools that supports online discussion. It is an alternative form of communication to in-class, verbal discussion – whether simply to provide variety in the subject, to meet the different needs and preferences of individuals, or to allow students time to reflect on the debate and consider their response before contributing. Forums allow for time-delayed communication and asynchronous learning – anytime, anywhere. In this hands-on workshop, we will focus on IVLE discussion forum that is widely-used on campus.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • differentiate asynchronous and synchronous communication tools;
  • facilitate and manage discussions using forums in IVLE; and
  • reflect on ways to enhance student-teacher interaction both inside and outside the classroom.
Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong 15/05/2018 (Tuesday)
10am-12noon
25 Assessing student learning using IVLE (IVLE: Part 3)
Register now

Synopsis
Assessment is a crucial element in enhancing the overall quality of teaching and learning in higher education. What and how students learn depends to a major extent on how they think they will be assessed (Biggs & Tang, 2007). This workshop focuses on the creation and use of assessment and quizzing materials for your courses using IVLE. Participants will discover how online assessment is valuable and how using these tools can create a dynamic learning environment.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • set up online tests and quizzes;
  • create question banks to create assessment questions, quizzes or MCQs;
  • analyse different situations for which an online assessment can be used; and
  • identify various approaches to provide timely and constructive feedback.
Kiruthika Ragupathi & Charina Ong 15/05/2018 (Tuesday)
2pm-4pm
26 Online synchronous discussions for tutorials
Register now

Synopsis
The adoption of blended learning in higher education has advanced the use of technology to conduct tutorials through online synchronous discussion. Online synchronous discussions have the potential to enhance the study experience of students who are not able to attend the face-to-face class/tutorial. In this hands-on workshop, the facilitators will share a framework and some considerations for facilitating online synchronous tutorial discussion. We will also introduce you to a powerful Web conferencing application that allows you and your students to collaborate in a secure online environment. You will be able to share documents and deliver presentations in real time using a Web browser and voice connection. The chat, Q&A, and poll features will definitely engage your students.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • apply the framework and strategies to facilitate an online synchronous discussion
  • set up an online virtual class
  • deliver online presentations
  • share documents to students
  • facilitate discussion using the Webex communication tools
  • encourage participation using the poll
Charina Ong & Jeanette Choy 12/06/2018 (Tuesday)
10am-12:30pm
27 Designing learning activities to promote active learning
Register now

Synopsis
Active learning is associated with student centred learning where the students are actively engaged in the learning process, rather than passively absorbing information. Although teachers may choose from many available instructional or learning tasks, it is often not clear how they promote deep learning and more importantly, how teachers can modify existing activities to increase engagement, or to assess the level to which students are engage during learning.

The workshop “Designing Learning Activities to Promote Deep Learning: Using ICAP as a Guide” aims to investigate and understand the design of learning activities that foster deep learning. Participants will be introduced to key concepts relating to a theoretical framework for active learning known as ICAP (Interactive – Constructive – Active – Passive), developed by Michelene Chi (2009). A framework through which we can classify teaching techniques in relation to the degree of cognitive engagement that they foster, can help us develop and evaluate our approach and instructions. This will ultimately have the potential to improve student learning. Strategies to engage students during learning will be explored in this workshop. In addition, opportunities will be provided for participants to review their teaching strategies with inputs from facilitator(s) and peers.

References:
Chi, M. T. H. (2009). Active-Constructive-Interactive: A Conceptual Framework for Differentiating Learning Activities. Topics in Cognitive Science, 1, 73–105.

Workshop Approach
Workshop conducted in a flipped classroom format where participants are encouraged to review pre-workshop online materials (i.e. video recordings, reading article) prior to the face-to-face workshop. It will be interspersed with:
  • Sharing of principles and concepts in designing learning strategies to engage students during learning
  • Demonstration of active learning strategies to enhance interactivity for your lessons


Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session, participants should be able to:
  • Identify key considerations when selecting the appropriate kind of teaching strategies to engage students in deep learning; and
  • Apply the principles and strategies to design learning activities that promote active engagement during learning
Jeanette Choy 14/06/2018 (Thursday)
2pm-4:30pm